STG1208featureimage

A new mandate from the IMO will require many international commercial ships to switch to electronic chart display and information systems. We find out why a reluctance to use new technologies, coupled with a lack of standardisation, has slowed the march of a technology which many claim could reduce the number of ships running aground by as much as 38%. We also take a look at the world’s biggest vessels, from giant passenger liners to mega-ton tankers and the latest fleet of floating facilities for the extraction of liquefied natural gas.

Moreover, we profile some of the most impressive private superyachts and the design features that make them stand out from the crowd. Looking into cruise operators’ efforts to cut carbon footprints and present a more eco-friendly image, we explore new energy saving technologies that are currently making waves in the industry.

Click here to read the latest issue.

In this issue

Shipping Piracy Report – July 2012
Ship Technology Global reports on incidents of piracy across the globe, covering the latest incidences and the international response to piracy in July 2012 in Africa, Asia, Europe and South America.
Read the full article.

Future of the Navigator
The progress in communication technologies during the last few decades has brought many advances to the marine industries, and Electronic Chart Display Information Systems (ECDIS) are set to become a mandatory safety feature. Chris Lo examines the systems and finds out why it has taken so long to implement.
Read the full article.

Oceanic Titans
The world’s largest ships exude a certain type of magnetism. We profile passenger liners, container ships and tankers to see which are the biggest of these record-breaking monsters.
Read the full article.

The Bigger the Better
Superyachts have been the favourite toy of the mega-rich for many years. Ship Technology Global takes a look at some of the most impressive private yachts currently sailing the seas and uncovers the designs and features that make them stand out.
Read the full article.

Cruising for Green
Cruise operators are taking steps to cut their emissions and present a more eco-friendly image, but many of these steps are small, and tend to focus on energy efficiency. Guy Richards reports on how new energy saving technologies are starting to make waves in the industry.
Read the full article.

The Pressure is On
In today’s competitive operating environment two fuel-related issues are dominating the agenda: high fuel costs and stricter sulphur regulations. Nigel Draffin of the International Bunker Industry Association explains what the group’s priorities are in this challenging climate.
Read the full article.

Floating Leviathans
Liquefied natural gas (LNG) is moving into a golden age, supported by Shell’s decision to go ahead with the world’s first floating liquefied natural gas facility (FLNG) and a fleet of high-tech mega ships. We explore the new generation of offshore production platforms.
Read the full article.

Next issue preview

The Costa Concordia sinking has moved the thriving European cruise market into difficult waters. We investigate how the incident was handled and look back on the factors that have made Europe’s cruise industry so successful in recent years. We also take a look at the technologies set to make waves in the shipping industry, from a robotic fish, which could revolutionise port clean-ups, to the mobile technologies that will give shipping companies a competitive advantage.

Moreover, we profile some of the ports currently under construction, including the Khalifa Port, Abu Dhabi, which is set to be one of the world’s largest ports and the Port of Hambantota in Sri Lanka. Finally, Canada’s Northwest Passage and Russia’s Northern Sea Route opened at the same time last year. We ask climate change experts how global warming could change the world’s shipping map in future.

The next issue will be out in October. Sign up for your free subscription to get each future issue delivered directly to your inbox.

Digital magazine FAQ

The digital magazine is viewable on any computer with Flash Player installed. It is also viewable on mobile devices, iPhones and iPads, although some features and videos may be disabled.

Read the latest issue.

View archive of back issues.