Ship Technology Global: Issue 31

In this issue: UK shipping and the EU referendum, managing risks in shipbuilding, the Crimea controversy, how to ensure cruise passenger safety in a climate of threats, a new prediction technique for rogue waves and more


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As the UK's referendum on EU membership approaches, what are the implications for the country's £10bn shipping industry? Access to Europe's single market and free-trade principles are a massive advantage, but the UK Chamber of Shipping has criticised overlapping regulation between the EU and the IMO and other issues. We ask industry insiders whether UK shipping would be better off inside or outside of the union.

Also in this issue, we ask Daewoo how risk management strategies are helping Asia's shipbuilders deal with the fallout from expensive forays into the offshore sector in the wake of the oil price crash, and we speak to Ferguson Marine about its plans to take on 150 new apprentices at its Clyde shipyard just two years after it was saved from closure. Plus, we investigate the legal issues of calling at Crimea's closed ports, find out how a new prediction tool for rogue waves could help improve safety on ships and offshore rigs, and ask how the cruise industry is mitigating safety threats during journeys in high-risk areas.

Read the issue for free on your iPad through our app, or if you're on a desktop computer you can also read it in our web viewer.

In this issue

In or Out?
On 23 June the British public will go to the polls to decide on the UK's membership of the EU. Gary Peters considers the implications for the shipping industry.
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Defying the Law
Amid tight economic sanctions and transit bans, navigating to Crimea is a legal minefield, but one that many are willing to cross. Eva Grey asks why.
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Managing the Risks
Shipbuilders are attempting to deal with the fallout of expensive forays into the offshore sector in the wake of the oil price crash. Rod James considers the problem and its solutions.
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The Next Generation
A Clyde shipyard has announced plans to take on 150 new apprentices. Gary Peters talks to Ferguson Marine's Kelly O'Rourke about the legacy of shipbuilding.
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Predicting Freak Waves
Once dismissed as folklore, rogue waves have been a key topic of scientific enquiry for the past 20 years. Abi Millar learns more about a new tool designed to help predict them.
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Staying Alert
Shifting patterns of risk could see cruise passengers cross paths with terrorism attacks, natural disasters and disease. Eva Grey considers how far the duty of cruise operators extends in ensuring passenger safety.
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Next issue preview

Draft rules designed to boost the efficiency and cut the cost of services at EU ports were voted in by the European Parliament earlier this year, drawing strong criticism from shipping companies over concerns that they have been watered down, omitting important port services. We ask what the draft guidance covers and whether shippers and service providers are right to be sceptical.

Also in the next issue, we find out how the Canadian Government can strengthen shipping regulations for Arctic waters, take a look at Rolls-Royce's vision for remotely controlled fleets of ships operated through land-based control networks, and get the latest on the controversial expansion project of Abbot Point coal port in Australia. Plus, we investigate how the introduction of new fuels has changed operation and maintenance and look into the ongoing discussion about sustainable ship recycling.

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