Ship Technology Global: Issue 38

In this issue: The IMO’s ruling on shipping efficiency, Australia’s cruise industry, the future of unmanned maritime vessels, finding new uses for shipping containers, how Xeneta is taking the containerised ocean freight market by storm, and more.


Ship Technology Global January 2017

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Hot on the heels of the Paris Agreement on climate change, the 70th session of the IMO’s Marine Environment Protection Committee took place in October to discuss new legislation to reduce shipping pollution. From a mandatory data collection system, to a global sulphur cap implementation, we take a look at the outcomes.

We also profile Australia’s cruise ship industry, ask whether 2017 is the year when autonomy will really begin to disrupt conventional shipping, and round up the most innovative ideas for shipping containers.

Plus, we find out how Xeneta crowdsources data to help the ocean freight industry, and ask whether the world’s legal shipping fleets could act as floating data collection hubs in the fight against illegal fishing.

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In this issue

IMO’s Landmark Ruling
At the end of October, the International Maritime Organization adopted a set of ground-breaking decisions on the environmental impact of shipping. Eva Grey reports.
Read the article.

Cruising to Record Numbers
By almost all measurements, Australia’s cruising industry is booming. The country is hosting record numbers of passengers, setting sail on new ships and visiting new destinations. Gary Peters investigates.
Read the article.

Unmanned Future
Autonomy is largely seen as the next big disruptor in the maritime world. So, is 2017 the year in which unmanned vessels really begin to make their presence felt? Gary Peters investigates.
Read the article.

Outside the Box
The humble container has been the backbone of the cargo shipping industry for decades. Now, it is being repurposed in a host of new and useful ways. Eva Grey finds out more.
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The Road to Transparency
Last year, price comparison platform Xeneta took the containerised ocean freight market by storm. Eva Grey finds out more from founder and CEO Patrik Berglund.
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Tackling Illegal Fishing
The international community is trying to crack down on illegal fishing using the power of big data. Eva Grey finds out whether shipping fleets could act as floating data collection hubs and help crack down on rogue fishing.
Read the article.

Next issue preview

A German-Canadian research partnership has launched the PASSAGES project to help make the icy waters of the Northwest Passages as navigable as possible in the future. With global warming making the Northwest Passage more accessible, could this research be the final piece of the puzzle to a more navigable sea route?

We also find out more about the government of Georgia’s plans to develop a $2.5bn Anaklia Deep Sea Port, take a closer look at the world’s first fully-automated vessel for offshore operations, and round up some of the best concepts from the maritime industry’s Hack the Sea event.

Plus, we look at the risks of illegal stowaways and what shippers can do to prevent such incidents, and speak to the authors of a study that aims to inform UK policy on the problem of underwater noise pollution.

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