Ship Technology Global: Issue 40

In this issue: Jamaica’s ambitions to become a top cruise destination, using hydrogen to power ships, LNG’s current state of affairs, Liverpool’s new container terminal, the impact of increased shipping in Arctic waters, cleaning up wrecks, and more.


Ship Technology Global March 2017

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In November, the Port Authority of Jamaica announced plans to fast-track the upgrade of its major cruise shipping towns to attract more business to the island. The modernisation projects include a $286m transformation at the resort town of Ocho Rios. We take a closer look at the plans.

We also consider the future of hydrogen fuel cells as a means of eco-friendly ship propulsion, delve deeper into the potential of LNG as more ship owners make the switch, and profile the city of Liverpool’s new container terminal.

Finally, we learn more about an appeal from six Arctic indigenous leaders to the International Maritime Organization about the dangers Arctic shipping pose to their livelihoods and communities, and speak to Ghost Fishing about the true cost of cleaning up shipwrecks.

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In this issue

Jamaica’s Cruise Ambitions
Last year Jamaica fast-tracked the upgrade of its top cruise towns to strengthen its status as a prime tourist destination in the Caribbean. Eva Grey finds out what’s in store for the country’s major ports.
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Hydrogen’s Call to Arms
Using hydrogen fuel cells as a means of eco-friendly ship propulsion is on the agenda for a growing number of tech leaders and shipping owners. But just how far could this trend go? Gary Peters investigates.
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LNG: State of Play
Much has been made of the potential of LNG, but what is the current state of affairs? And, is it really the panacea that many hope it will prove to be? Gary Peters reports.
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Liverpool’s Link to the World
Liverpool has opened a massive £400m container terminal, dubbed Liverpool2, making the city the UK’s “link to the world”, according to Secretary of State for International Trade, Liam Fox. Gary Peters finds out more.
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Arctic Voices
Increased shipping in Arctic waters is a direct threat to the livelihood of indigenous communities from Alaska, Canada and Russia. Eva Grey finds out more about the Arctic voices that are now demanding to be heard.
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Cleaning Up Shipwrecks
Shipwrecked vessels represent a serious environmental threat and a greater financial burden on the responsible party, with taxpayers sometimes left to foot large clean-up bills. Eva Grey takes a closer look at the problem.
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Next issue preview

For many in the shipping sector, 2016 was a tough year. The Baltic Dry Index reached an all-time low in February, with overcapacity, low rates and depressed global trade compounding the problem. We find out whether the worst is over.

We also take a closer look at what wearable technology could offer cruise passengers, explore the best ballast water treatment systems ahead of the IMO’s Ballast Water Management Convention enforcement, and ask whether the EU or IMO should take precedence on shipping emission regulations.

Plus, we find out more about Mexico’s $5bn investment into the country’s ports, and consider calls from pressure groups on the UK maritime industry to draw up a legislative timetable for ending pay discrimination in the country’s shipping industry.

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