EMP to provide Aquarius MAS + Solar solution to Singapore shipping company


Japanese technology group Eco Marine Power (EMP) has entered a memorandum of understanding (MoU) with an undisclosed Singapore-based shipping company to supply its Aquarius management and automation (MAS)+ Solar solution.

The solution will feature hardware and software designed to allow ships to monitor fuel oil consumption in real time.

The systems will automatically calculate nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulphur oxides(SOx), and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, as well as be able to interface with marine solar power systems.

One vessel from the Singapore-based shipping company will be equipped with the Aquarius MAS + Solar technology under the newly signed MoU, and the solution's performance will be jointly evaluated by both companies.

The system will also include marine-grade solar panel mounting frames, which will be designed and manufactured by Teramoto Iron Works of Onomichi, Japan.

"It is pleasing after years of research and development that marine solar power is now being viewed as a viable source of emissions-free power on ships."

ClassNK-approved UB-50-12 Valve Regulated Lead Acid (VRLA) batteries from the Furukawa Battery Company will also be provided as part of the deal.

Eco Marine Power chief technology officer Greg Atkinson said: “It is pleasing after years of research and development that our efforts are gaining further recognition across the shipping sector and that marine solar power is now being viewed as a viable source of emissions-free power on ships.”

EMP’s Aquarius MAS system has been developed on the basis of KEI 3240 Data Logger, which is already in use on hundreds of vessels, including tug boats, training ships, tankers and bulk ore carriers.

The company has also developed a marine solar power solution that can be integrated with a marine computers, battery chargers, batteries, marine-grade solar panels, as well as other equipment and sensors.


Image: Marine grade solar panel and frame at Teramoto Iron Works, Onomichi, Japan. Photo: courtesy of Eco Marine Power.