New shore power project completed at Port of Montréal in Canada


A new shore power project that aims to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution has been completed at the Port of Montréal in Canada.

The development will allow ships docking at the port to shut down their diesel engines and connect to an electrical grid, which is powered by renewable energy.

Greenhouse gas emissions are expected to be reduced by around 2,800t annually as a result of the newly completed initiative.

The project will also facilitate the removal of 700 trucks off the road per year.

The C$11m ($8.6m) project was developed under the Government of Canada’s Shore Power Technology for Ports programme, and the Canadian Government has supplied an estimated C$5m ($3.9m) towards the development.

Additional funding has been provided by the Government of Quebec and Montréal Port Authority.

"By taking action to reduce greenhouse gases and air pollution we are improving the lives of Canadians, while investing in the future of cleaner transportation."

Canada Transport Minister Marc Garneau said: “The Government of Canada is committed to maintaining a safe, efficient and green transportation system.

“By taking action to reduce greenhouse gases and air pollution we are improving the lives of Canadians, while investing in the future of cleaner transportation.

“New and emerging technologies are laying the groundwork for Canada’s present and future economic growth.”

The Canadian Government has noted that the new shore power technology will also help ships to receive cheaper and cleaner energy at the Port of Montréal.

The government is currently providing up to C$27.2m ($21m) funding to Canadian port authorities, terminal operators and ferry owners to support the deployment of marine shore power technology as part of its Shore Power Technology for Ports programme.

Four shore power projects have been completed under the initiative to date, in addition to the Port of Montréal development.