Research finds new infrastructure could reduce emissions in Norwegian ports


A new research report from the ReCharge project has revealed that shore power and charging infrastructure could reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions by around 12.5 million tonnes per year at ports in Norway.

ReCharge is an initiative that seeks to help establish zero emission ports in Norway, and includes experts from ABB, DNV GL, Port of Oslo and Cavotec as members.

The newly released ReCharge report has evaluated the sources of emissions at Norwegian ports and potential options for reducing emissions.

It has also examined the specific kinds of charging and shore power infrastructure that would be necessary to effectively alleviate emissions at the ports.

ReCharge's report has highlighted 64 vessels that feature an operational profile that would allow them to run on battery propulsion.

"The ReCharge project aims to guide the industry in overcoming technical and financial barriers, and support the wider adaptation of shore power and charging technologies."

The report also noted that charging infrastructure for 97 different routes would be required to be developed, should the vessels need connecting to an electrical grid.

The suggestion is expected to reduce 12,517t of CO2 emissions and 14,133kg of nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions.

Cavotec E-Ferries global system specialist Sofus Dahl said: “The ReCharge project aims to guide the industry in overcoming technical and financial barriers, and support the wider adaptation of shore power and charging technologies.”

In addition, ReCharge has used new technologies to develop a calculator for operators to measure costs and the potential for reducing emissions, which is expected to allow a more targeted and effective approach for the execution of shore power and charging systems.


Image: A shore power dispenser unit charging the Vision of the Fjords at the Flåm berth in Norway. Photo: courtesy of Cavotec SA.