Sonardyne installs sonar technology at new CNI facility in Middle East


UK-based Sonardyne International has installed its underwater intruder detection sonar system known as Sentinel on the site of a new, undisclosed critical national infrastructure (CNI) facility in the Middle East in order to help detect unlawful access from the sea. 

A number of sonar units were installed by Sonardyne’s local partner in the Middle East on permanent seabed mounts, which were placed in major locations around the shoreline.

The technology will be used to detect, track and classify various small underwater vehicles approaching the CNI, which consists of power plants, dams, gas storage terminals and offshore oil platforms.

It is also capable of alerting security personnel to any potential threat that could harm the CNI platform, as it represents an attractive target for sabotage.

Additionally, the technology is designed to provide complete coverage and can determine the type of diving equipment being worn by the incoming threats.

"Our announcement today marks the end of many months of planning and on-site activities with our local technical partners and end client to deliver, install and commission Sentinel."

The Sentinel in-water sonar unit features a small and lightweight design that makes it suitable for mobile security operations.

Sonardyne Middle East Maritime Security representative Paul Rosewarne said: “Our announcement today marks the end of many months of planning and on-site activities with our local technical partners and end client to deliver, install and commission Sentinel at this important new facility.” 

The company has also provided its dual redundant control-room equipment for the CNI in order to provide uninterrupted situational awareness.

The equipment was interfaced with the facility’s third-party command and control (C2) security system.


Image: Sonardyne’s Sentinel reliably detects, tracks and classifies divers and small underwater vehicles approaching a waterside properties, alerting security personnel to the potential threat. Photo: courtesy of Sonardyne.