ClassNK introduces modified BWTS installation guidelines

25 February 2016 (Last Updated February 25th, 2016 18:30)

Ship classification society ClassNK has introduced modifications to its guidelines on the installation of ballast water treatment (BWT) systems.

ClassNK

Ship classification society ClassNK has introduced modifications to its guidelines on the installation of ballast water treatment (BWT) systems.

The latest modifications include change in the application date of the ballast water performance standard based on the revised implementation schedule adopted by IMO Assembly resolution A.1088 (28).

It also includes additions, modifications of definitions and a revision of standards for installation of BWT systems.

"The modifications introduced on the standard of installing of BWT systems is said to be in response to the International Association Of Classification Societies (IACS) unified requirement (UR) M74 installation of BWT systems which was adopted last year."

The modifications introduced on the standard of installing of BWT systems is said to be in response to the International Association Of Classification Societies (IACS) unified requirement (UR) M74 installation of BWT systems which was adopted last year.

Additional requirements are related to tankers carrying flammable liquids, in an attempt to preserve the marine ecosystem, promote an onboard safety, as well as ensuring the structural strength and integrity of the ship.

The International Maritime Organisation (IMO) had developed and released the International Convention for the Control and Management of Ships’ Ballast Water and Sediments, 2004 (BWM Convention) in a bid to immunise the marine flora and fauna from the transmitted harmful aquatic organisms in ballast water carried by ships.

Last month, ClassNK had announced adopting modifications to its rules and guidance for the survey and construction of steel ships which aimed at addressing the structural strength requirements of container carriers.


Image: Cargo ship expelling ballast water into the sea. Photo: courtesy of US Coast Guard.