Havyard to design and build two wind turbine service vessels for Esvagt

14 July 2013 (Last Updated July 14th, 2013 18:30)

Norway-based Havyard has secured a contract from Danish operator Esvagt for the design and construction of two wind turbine service vessels.

ESVAGT

Norway-based Havyard has secured a contract from Danish operator Esvagt for the design and construction of two wind turbine service vessels.

Planned to be built on the Havyard 832 SOV design, the new vessels will have a length of 83.7m, width of 17.6m and will be capable of running a speed of 14 knots.

Construction of the new vessels will be carried out at Havyard Ship Technology’s shipyard in Leirvik in Sogn, Norway, and the ships are scheduled to be delivered in December 2014 and March 2015 respectively.

Havyard said it is designing vessels for offshore wind farm services for the first time and the basis for this design is taken from technology that it has developed and delivered to the offshore oil industry.

Havyard Design & Solutions sales manager Gisle Vinjevoll Thrane said the company has worked with Esvagt and these projects over a long period of time and it has been a demanding process.

"Havyard 832 SOV has been designed based on specifications from Esvagt and together with our solid competence within shipbuilding and design of advanced offshore vessels, we have together made a product that the market demands."

"Havyard 832 SOV has been designed based on specifications from Esvagt and together with our solid competence within shipbuilding and design of advanced offshore vessels, we have together made a product that the market demands," Thrane said.

Havyard Design & Solutions design manager Arve Leine said the 832 SOV design is based on the company’s PSVs, where it has incorporated technology that is used to serve the needs for service and maintenance of offshore windmill installations.

"The most successful development of new products are often based on recycling familiar technology, but quite likely improved and made use of in new ways," Leine said.

"Main capabilities for such a vessel is that it needs to be a stable, secure and comfortable work platform for the crew working on the windmill installations and that it has capacities for carrying necessary equipment and cargo," Leine added.

Esvagt has a fleet of 39 vessels including the two Havyard vessels and it operates within emergency rescue and response (ERRV) and anchor handling tug supply (AHTS) vessels, safety training and oil spill contingency.


Image: Havyard will deliver Esvagt’s two new service operation vessels of 832 SOV design in December 2014 and March 2015. Photo courtesy of Havyard.