MAN Diesel & Turbo to upgrade eleven Odfjell tankers

8 June 2015 (Last Updated June 8th, 2015 18:30)

MAN Diesel & Turbo's Propeller & Aft Ship unit has secured a contract to retrofit and upgrade a series of eleven 37,500dwt vessels from the Odfjell chemical tanker fleet.

Bow Firda

MAN Diesel & Turbo’s Propeller & Aft Ship unit has secured a contract to retrofit and upgrade a series of eleven 37,500dwt vessels from the Odfjell chemical tanker fleet.

The tankers scheduled for upgrade work are Bow Flower, Bow Clipper, Bow Fortune, Bow Cecil, Bow Flora, Bow Cardinal, Bow Faith, Bow Cedar, Bow Fagus, Bow Chain and Bow Firda.

These Kværner-class vessels will undergo upgrade works during 2015 to 2017, and the first vessel in this series, M/T Bow Clipper, is expected to dock and start refurbishment in August.

MAN Diesel & Turbo Propeller & Aft Ship organisation business development manager Kjartan Ross said: "With our new design possibilities, we are furthermore looking forward to offering this fuel-saving concept to other fleets with similar operational patterns.

"We are looking forward to offering this fuel-saving concept to other fleets with similar operational patterns."

"With the long lifetime expectancy of Odfjell’s high-value, quality vessels, this upgrade investment is straightforward and very attractive."

These vessels are equipped with a MAN B&W two-stroke engine that power a four-bladed, controllable-pitch propeller and a PTO-driven shaft alternator.

With new MAN’s highly efficient Kappel propeller blades, a fairing cone and a pre-fabricated rudder bulb kit, the vessels will have new service speed at reduced main-engine output, offering better power savings and reduced exhaust-gas emissions.

The first vessel in the series was delivered in 1994, while the lastest was handed over in 2003.

The ships were constructed under the Kværner-class new-build programme and feature controllable pitch propellers, shaft alternators on main engines, bow thrusters, fixed tank-cleaning machines and radar positioned in each tank to gauge ullage.


Image: M/T Bow Firda chemical tanker ship. Photo: courtesy of MAN SE.