Marine South East GLEAMS project says glycerine is a viable marine fuel

16 October 2014 (Last Updated October 16th, 2014 18:30)

Marine South East's Glycerine Fuel for Marine Sustainability (GLEAMS) project has named glycerine as a viable and low-emission alternative to marine fuel.

GLEAMS_ test generator

Marine South East’s Glycerine Fuel for Marine Sustainability (GLEAMS) project has named glycerine as a viable and low-emission alternative to marine fuel.

This declaration follows the analysis of evidences submitted by the project consortium.

Research found that the adoption of glycerine fuel is favourable in defined markets due to its non-toxic, clean burning and safe characteristics.

The consortium will develop an outline plan for its commercial realisation, including its pilot operational usage.

GLEAMS is now seeking adopters for the technology among wind farm support vessels, research and education vessels, military specialist craft and super yachts.

The project has also suggested that the technology would be suitable for the cold-ironing (shore power) sector.

"This development disproves the general view that glycerine can’t be used as a fuel due to its physical and chemical properties." 

According to Marine South East, this development disproves the general view that glycerine can’t be used as a fuel due to its physical and chemical properties.

The project had demonstrated the glycerine-powered GLEAMS emissions test engine for three days at Seawork International 2014 to prove its claim.

At present, glycerine is being developed as a by-product of the bio-diesel industry and has a supply excess.

With the available content, only a range of smaller vessel types and shore applications can be powered.

GLEAMS has been working with the University of Greenwich for this initiative and its project partners are Marine South East, Aquafuel Research, Gardline Marine Sciences, Lloyd’s Register EMEA and Redwing Environmental.

The project is co-funded by Innovate UK (formerly the Technology Strategy Board) and the UK Defence Science and Technology Laboratory.


Image: The project demonstrated the glycerine-powered GLEAMS emissions test engine for three days at Seawork International 2014. Photo: courtesy of GLEAMS.