Seaspan to deploy Germanischer Lloyd’s hull management system across entire fleet

4 March 2013 (Last Updated March 4th, 2013 18:30)

Canada-based Seaspan Ship Management has selected Germanischer Lloyd's GL HullManager system to improve its in-house hull integrity management system.

GLHullManagerScreenshot_web

Canada-based Seaspan Ship Management has selected Germanischer Lloyd’s GL HullManager system to improve its in-house hull integrity management system.

As part of the deal, Germanischer Lloyd’s condition-based monitoring software GL HullManager will be installed across Seaspan’s complete fleet of 76 vessels over the coming years.

Seaspan’s director of projects and technology Peter Jackson said the company developed its own temporary hull structure monitoring system to meet its needs until it could decide on its preferred system.

"Three different systems were reviewed and as a result, GL HullManager was selected as the software most closely meeting our needs," Jackson said.

The system, which is part of GL’s fleet management software portfolio, has been developed to offer hull inspection for ship owners, managers and operators.

GL said HullManager supports the entire hull integrity process, from inspections to reporting and condition assessments of tanks, cargo holds and coatings across the lifecycle by means of crew inspections and thickness measurements.

Use of a vessel-specific 3D model allows visualisation and assessment of the hull’s structural condition, while the system will also allow crew members to mark findings, attach photos and descriptions to a 3D model of their vessel, which can then be viewed onshore.

GL vice president of business development for the Americas Ryan Bishop said: "Clients are finding that the system is one that they can easily integrate into their existing maintenance processes, with the added benefit of on and offshore teams having access to the same data."

GL HullManager has been equipped on 350 vessels since it was launched in 2011.


Image: GL HullManager will allow crew members to mark findings, attach photos and descriptions to a 3D model of their vessel that can then be viewed onshore. Image: GL Group.