Wartsila and Cavotec to jointly develop induction charging and automatic mooring concept

25 January 2016 (Last Updated January 25th, 2016 18:30)

Wärtsilä and Cavotec have signed a contract to start developing the world's first combined induction charging and automatic mooring concept.

Cavotec

Wärtsilä and Cavotec have signed a contract to start developing the world’s first combined induction charging and automatic mooring concept.

Wartsila has engineered a wireless charging system based on inductive power transfer, which will eliminate the usage of cable connection between the vessel and shore, subsequently facilitating a secured connections and disconnections.

Additionally, it cuts down the scope of maintenance due to reduced chances of abrasion in an absence of a physical connection.

Similarly, damage to electrical outlets caused by seawater, snow and ice is also avoided.

Cavotec Group CEO Ottonel Popesco said: "This is an exciting project and we are delighted to be partnering with Wärtsilä to make shipping cleaner, safer, and easier.

"The envisioned integrated wireless charging and mooring system will further the marine industry’s environmental profile."

The charging grid will have the capacity to transfer more than 1MW of electrical energy, which is some 300 times more than that of current chargers used by electric cars.

"This is an exciting project and we are delighted to be partnering with Wärtsilä to make shipping cleaner, safer, and easier."

Cavotec’s mooring system is based on vacuum-based automated mooring technology, which removes the requirement for conventional mooring lines.

The remote-controlled vacuum pads can recess into, or are mounted on the quayside, and can moor and release vessels in just a matter of seconds.

Wärtsilä Marine Solutions director for power products Peter Rogers said: "During recent years, wireless charging has been introduced for cars, busses and trains.

"Wärtsilä has now made this possible also for marine vessels."


Image: A pier mounted charging station provides safe and secure connections. Photo: courtesy of Wärtsilä.