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October 3, 2012

MHI installs air lubrication system on Ferry Naminoue

Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI) has installed its new Mitsubishi Air Lubrication System (MALS) on the Ferry Naminoue, a ship owned by Japan's A-Line Ferry.

By admin-demo

Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI) has installed its new Mitsubishi Air Lubrication System (MALS) on the Ferry Naminoue, a ship owned by Japan’s A-Line Ferry.

Trial tests have been conducted at sea on the vessel, which is equipped with MALS to reduce frictional resistance between the vessel hull and seawater using air bubbles produced at the vessel bottom, resulting in reduction of energy consumption and CO2 emissions.

During the test, the ferry reported a reduction in necessary propulsion power of more than 5%, even with waves as high as 2.5 to 3m.

MHI said the tests have confirmed that the MALS can be installed on high-speed, slender ships.

MHI’s Shimonoseki Shipyard & Machinery Works built the 8,072t Ferry Naminoue, which has a length of 145m, width of 24m and a designed draft of 6.2m.

The vessel operates on the Kagoshima-Amami-Okinawa route in southern Japan.

In order to confirm significant energy savings, MHI installed MALS for the first time in 2010 on two module carriers, the Yamatai and Yamato, operated by NYK-Hinode Line.

MHI said that in future it will continue to monitor the operational conditions of the Ferry Naminoue and verify MALS’ effectiveness in both energy saving and CO2 emissions reduction.

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