Ship Technology Global June 2017

Ship Technology Global is now free for the iPad. Download our app to read the latest issue and browse our back issues for free.

Siemens and Land Rover BAR have teamed up to design, evaluate and verify an America’s Cup class catamaran in a bid to design a winning racing boat and launch it within just 30 months. We take a closer look to find out how these incredible vessels are designed.

We also find out more about a US project to test robotic welding technologies for shipbuilding, profile a new ship tunnel that will run through the narrowest point of the Norwegian Stad Peninsula, and look at plans to expand the Port of Virginia in an effort to boost annual container capacity by 40% by 2020.

Finally, we catch up with one of the IMO’s new Maritime Technology Cooperation Centres to find out how the maritime industry can reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and ask whether shipping companies are living up to their pledges to tackle contraband.

Read the issue for free on your iPad through our app, or if you're on a desktop computer you can also read it in our web viewer.

In this issue

A Winning Design
Siemens teamed up with Land Rover BAR to design, evaluate and verify an America’s Cup Class catamaran and launch it within just 30 months. Gary Peters finds out how they did it.
Read the article here.

Robotic Welding: Is the US Ready?
Over the last two years, the US National Shipbuilding Research Program has been running a project to test robotic welding technologies for shipbuilding. Ross Davies finds out more from the project’s lead stakeholders.
Read the article here.

The Stad Ship Tunnel
A new ship tunnel, described as the first of its kind and designed to bypass a highly dangerous area, has been included in Norway’s latest national transport plan. Gary Peters asks whether the Stad Ship Tunnel is feasible.
Read the article here.

Virginia’s East Coast Gateway
The Port of Virginia has started a $320m expansion effort at the Virginia International Gateway. The project is one of two that, when complete, will boost annual container capacity by 40% by 2020. Ross Davies takes a closer look.
Read the article here.

Network for Efficiency
A new project aims to harness the local expertise of maritime research institutions from developing countries to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and promote energy efficiency in the shipping industry. Eva Grey finds out more.
Read the article here.

Battling Against Contraband
An investigation by Sea Shepherd recently revealed large quantities of shark fins being transported in shipping containers, despite international bans and corporate pledges to end the practice. Eva Grey investigates the problem.
Read the article here.

Next issue preview

MacGregor and Rolls-Royce have agreed to explore the impact of developments in autonomy for cargo ship navigation, in that hope that remote-controlled vessels will be in commercial use by the end of the decade. We take a look at this ambitious target.

We also find out more about a Port of Rotterdam study to develop LNG from renewable sources, consider the challenge of responsible cruise tourism, and look at the Port of Gdansk’s plans to expand and boost capacity by adding more deepwater transhipment quays.

Finally, we talk to the Maritime Piracy Humanitarian Response Programme about the mental health effects on crew members who experience piracy first-hand, and investigate a successful campaign to block a controversial government plan to change the rules that govern Spanish ports.

Digital magazine FAQ

You can read Ship Technology Global for free on the iPad. Download our app to read the latest issue and browse the back issues in our archive. Sign up for a free subscription in the app and never miss a new issue.

You can also continue to read the desktop version for free on our web viewer. (Browser compatibility: The web viewer works in the latest two version of Chrome, Firefox and Safari, as well as in Internet Explorer 9 and 10. Some features may not be compatible with older browser versions.)