Ship Technology Global: Issue 44

In this issue: Developments in autonomy for cargo ship navigation, using bio LNG to reduce emissions in shipping, how the cruise industry can accommodate responsible tourism, expanding the Port of Gdansk, and more.


Ship Technology Global July 2017

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MacGregor and Rolls-Royce have agreed to explore the impact of developments in autonomy for cargo ship navigation, in the hope that remote-controlled vessels will be in commercial use by the end of the decade. We take a look at this ambitious target.

We also find out more about a Port of Rotterdam study to develop LNG from renewable sources, consider the challenge of responsible cruise tourism, and look at the Port of Gdansk’s plans to expand and boost capacity by adding more deepwater transhipment quays.

Finally, we talk to the Maritime Piracy Humanitarian Response Programme about the mental health effects on crew members who experience piracy first-hand, and consider whether a controversial plan to change the rules that govern Spanish ports spells the beginning of yet more concern for the country’s maritime sector.

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In this issue

Automation: Target 2030
MacGregor and Rolls-Royce have agreed to explore the impact of developments in autonomy for cargo ship navigation and cargo systems onboard container ships. The aim? For autonomous vessels to be a common sight on the seas by 2030. Frances Marcellin reports.
Read the article here.

Renewable Fuel
The Port of Rotterdam and the National LNG Platform are embarking on a study to develop LNG from renewable resources. Promising drastic CO2 emissions reductions, bio LNG could help the shipping sector reach its climate goals. Eva Grey finds out more.
Read the article here.

A Cruise Too Far
Popular locations, particularly exotic places and coastal cities, can become victims of overtourism, which puts a strain on the daily lives of residents. Eva Grey asks whether the cruise industry can alter its practices to accommodate responsible tourism.
Read the article here.

Growing Gdansk
The Port of Gdansk recently laid out its largest development proposal in 40 years. With new infrastructure planned at its main terminals, the port aims to accommodate the growing trade volumes passing through the Baltic. Eva Grey finds out more.
Read the article here.

Battle Scars
The maritime sector has been rocked by a recent spike in piracy. But, while the hijackings and counter-piracy methods are well documented, less is written about the mental health effects on those who suffer piracy first-hand. Gary Peters reports.
Read the article here.

Trouble Ahead
A controversial government plan to change the rules that govern Spanish ports has been approved. Gary Peters asks, is this the end of the road, or the beginning of yet more concern for Spain’s maritime sector?
Read the article here.

Next issue preview

NATO has sponsored research into establishing the first ever digital underwater communications standard, between networks of autonomous undersea robots. We find out more from the team behind the invention.

We also take a look at the Port Authority of Singapore’s recent technology investments, which are part of plans to develop a next-generation facility at Jurong Port, find out how marine engines can be redesigned to limit NOx emissions and black smoke, and investigate a Norwegian vessel that could be used for commercial seaweed production.

Finally, we learn about a project in New Zealand to recreate one of the oldest ships in the world using 3D modelling, and ask whether sea blindness is a myth or a reality, after 84% of the UK public correctly identified shipping as the principal mode of transport for imports and exports in a recent poll.

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