Canada-based marine engineering company Robert Allanis set to partner with Kongsberg Maritime to develop a new remotely operated fireboat to address the safety and security requirements of modern ports.

The unmanned fireboat, RALamander, will be designed to allow first responders to combat dangerous port fires more safely and aggressively.

It is expected to provide in-close firefighting and ‘eye in the fire’ capability for firefighting professionals, enabling them to safely and effectively carry out a variety of missions such as combating container, petrochemical, shore-side structure and vessel fires.

"The boat will be equipped with the Kongsberg Maritime control and communications system, which features a high-bandwidth, low-latency wireless link to a semi-portable RALamander operator console."

RALamander will be deployable as an addition to conventional firefighting assets or as a solo unit.

The boat will be equipped with the Kongsberg Maritime control and communications system, which features a high-bandwidth, low-latency wireless link to a semi-portable RALamander operator console that can be located on a manned fireboat or other vessels, including tug or pilot boats.

RALamander will also feature a Kongsberg autonomous control system with re-configuring or upgrading capabilities.

The first vessel to be developed under the collaboration will be a 20m RALamander 2000, which will feature Fi Fi 1 firefighting capability and 2400m³/hr total pumping capacity with optional foam.

It will also be equipped with a retractable mast in order to bring one of the three monitors to a high point of attack for shipboard or dock fires.

Various automated functions such as dynamic positioning, water spray target holding and ‘line protection’ are also expected to be incorporated to help RALamander automatically move back and forth along a line when directing protective spray over onshore structures or vessels threatened by a fire.

In addition, RALamander can be used to tow a burning vessel that poses a threat to its surroundings to a safe distance using its Grapnel Emergency Towing (GET) system.