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The most recent update to Electronic Chart Display and Information Systems appears to have been ignored by many, despite improvements to danger detection, sensor integration and alarm management. Is general distrust of software updates to blame, or do manufacturers need to work harder to communicate their benefits?

We also take a closer look at the ferry industry as it gears up for growth, profile Finland’s first hybrid-electric ferry, explore the most innovative predictive visibility projects helping ports cut costs, and consider the major questions posed by autonomy on the seas and what any potential regulation could look like.

Finally, we map the world’s hotspots for shipping incidents such as piracy and collisions, and talk to the Royal Alfred Seafarer Society about the importance of offering retired seafarers like-minded companionship and suitable care.

In this issue

ECDIS: is the industry ignoring an important update?
A costly experience left shipowners wary of upgrading their electronic chart and display systems, and as a result, many may be missing out on an important technology. Eva Grey finds out more from Oliver Schwarz, Chartworld International business development director.
Read the article.

What’s driving the ferry industry?
The ferry industry is gearing up for growth with more than £1bn of new vessels set to be built. So why the demand? Frances Marcellin learns more from Emma Batchelor, director of Discover Ferries.
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The Elektra: Finland’s first hybrid-electric ferry
Scandinavia is leading the world when it comes to battery-powered solutions for the shipbuilding industry. Alex love visited Finland to find out more about the technology and take a ride on Finferries’ Elektra, the country’s first electric hybrid ferry.
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Predictive analytics: the new hot ticket in shipping?
The adoption of predictive analytics for port operations is proving increasingly popular, as the technology can help ports help achieve better unloading and offloading times. However, challenges still remain in the implementation of new predictive technologies, as Joe Baker reports.
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Is it time to talk about regulating autonomous ships?
With technology for unmanned ships developing rapidly, regulatory authorities are playing catch-up. A major new report commissioned by the Danish Maritime Authority (DMA) unpicks the challenges posed by autonomy on the seas and outlines how they can be overcome. Patrick Kingsland finds out more from Erik Tvedt, special adviser at the DMA.
Read the article here.

The Royal Alfred Society: a shelter for seafarers since 1865
For over 150 years, the Royal Alfred Seafarers’ Society has been providing retired seafarers and their dependants a safe haven in their later years. Eva Grey finds out more about the charity, whose commitment is the same as the day it was founded.
Read the article here.

The most dangerous waters in the world?
Increasing piracy, shipping accidents and political disputes have made Southeast Asia a dangerous place for seafarers. But what is the cause of these issues, and to what extent are countries in the region taking steps to solve them? Joe Baker reports.
Read the article here.

The future of the UK maritime sector
Where is the UK maritime sector going and what does it need from the UK Government to get there? These questions are being addressed as Maritime UK discusses and pulls together a new sector deal in response to the government’s industrial strategy. Ben Murray, Maritime UK director, reports.
Read the article here.

Next issue preview

A series of amendments to the Convention on Facilitation of International Maritime Traffic that seeks to boost seafarers’ rights to shore leave have come into effect in an attempt to streamline and approve procedures for ships’ arrival, stay and departure from ports. We look into why a new standard was necessary.

We also take a closer look at the implication of India’s move to manage part of the strategic Chabahar Port, speak to Maritime UK about the challenges ahead for the UK’s ports following Brexit, and find out what is being done to regulate and mitigate emissions at ports around the UK.

Finally, we investigate the expected route for Kanal Istanbul, a planned artificial shipping channel between the Black Sea and the Sea of Marmara, in light of concerns from environmentalists, and consider the problem of maritime corruption.