Provider of emission-free ammonia power solutions AMOGY has signed a contract to procure fuel cell engines from Ballard Power Systems, a provider of zero-emission fuel cell technology, for ammonia-to-power maritime applications.

A scalable fuel cell system, Ballard’s FCwave engine is certified to operate in marine environments.

Amogy’s ammonia-to-power platform depends on ammonia cracking technology, which enables hydrogen extraction on board a vessel to provide fuel for a hydrogen engine.

This platform has been demonstrated successfully in many industrial applications.

Currently, the company is scaling the technology for application in maritime vessels and has plans to roll it out for tank barge and tugboat operations.

According to the contract, Amogy agreed to initially buy three, 200kW FCwave engines.

Ballard will provide support towards the integration of the fuel cell engines with Amogy’s ammonia reforming system.

The initial FCwave engines will be delivered by Ballard to Amogy next year for maritime deployment.

Following the completion of the initial project, a follow-on order for another seven FCwave engines is expected.

Amogy CEO Seonghoon Woo said: “This contract and collaboration opportunity with Ballard is a significant and valuable step as Amogy expands its efforts in the maritime sector.

“With access to their leading fuel cell technology and team of experts, together we can expedite commercialisation of scalable, ammonia-to-power solutions for the maritime industry and support global sustainability goals.”

Ballard Power Systems Europe general manager for marine and stationary Søren Østergaard Hansen said: “We are excited for the opportunity to work with Amogy and bring our clean and innovative technologies together. We believe Amogy’s on-board capabilities to convert ammonia to gaseous hydrogen combined with our fuel cell engines will be a major milestone to achieve decarbonisation in the marine sector.”

The International Maritime Organisation’s emissions-reduction targets feature a 40% reduction in the greenhouse gas emissions of global fleets by the end of this decade, followed by a 70% reduction by 2050, compared with 2008 levels.

For ship operators to achieve these goals, global fleets need to start incorporating commercially feasible zero-emissions vessels.

Given the several promising maritime applications for hydrogen fuel involving ammonia as a carrier of hydrogen, the two companies believe that their partnership will showcase ammonia power platforms in maritime use cases.