BMT and Black & Veatch to develop marine VTAS project for ETI

12 February 2018 (Last Updated February 12th, 2018 12:42)

UK-based design, engineering and risk management consultancy firm BMT, in collaboration with Black & Veatch, is set to create a marine vessel technology assessment system (VTAS) for the Energy Technologies Institute (ETI) in the UK.

UK-based design, engineering and risk management consultancy firm BMT, in collaboration with Black & Veatch, is set to create a marine vessel technology assessment system (VTAS) for the Energy Technologies Institute (ETI) in the UK.

The £1.8m project has been commissioned and funded by ETI.

BMT and Black & Veatch will work together to develop independent, transparent and insightful information as part of the initiative.

The data is intended to help stakeholders and decision makers to positively influence commercial shipping operators to reduce fuel their consumption.

“The efficient use of fuel through the implementation of energy saving devices (ESDs) will be critical to the future affordability, security and sustainability of maritime transport.”

The project is anticipated to assist the global effort to change the shipping industry’s current propulsion designs and operations.

It will primarily focus on characterising and addressing perceived barriers to the adoption of energy saving devices (ESDs) by offering data-driven technical models of individual ships and combining them with the necessary financial modelling to help capture both CAPEX and operational issues accurately.

The initiative is eventually expected to lead to the rapid adoption of fuel-efficient technologies by the shipping sector.

ETI HDV marine efficiency project manager David Butler said: “Maritime transport emits around 1,000 million tonnes of CO2 annually and is responsible for about 3% of global greenhouse gas emissions.

“Furthermore, the International Maritime Organization states that emissions could rise by 50%-250% by 2050 compared to 2011 levels.

“Therefore, the efficient use of fuel through the implementation of energy saving devices (ESDs) will be critical to the future affordability, security and sustainability of maritime transport.”

According to BMT, a suit of ESDs such as Flettner rotors, high-efficiency propellers and wingsail technologies are currently available on the market, though the perceived technical and financial risks of implementing these technologies have led to the slow adoption of these solutions within the shipping industry.