Evac to install growth prevention system on oil spill response vessel

15 September 2020 (Last Updated September 15th, 2020 12:28)

Evac will install its Cathelco marine growth prevention system on the multi-purpose oil spill response vessel built for Kuwait Oil.

Evac to install growth prevention system on oil spill response vessel
The multi-purpose oil spill response vessel for Kuwait Oil will be used in Kuwait and international waters. Credit: Evac.

Evac will install its Cathelco marine growth prevention system on the multi-purpose oil spill response vessel built for Kuwait Oil.

The system is expected to prevent biofouling and corrosion in seawater pipework. Cathelco, which is a part of the Evac Group, manufactured the system.

The 60m-long vessel is being constructed at Turkey’s Uzmar Shipyard. It is expected to be delivered in the fourth quarter of this year.

The vessel will be used for towing services, area surveillance, offshore firefighting, logistics support duties, as well as search-and-rescue around Kuwait and in international waters.

To protect the pipeline from marine growth and corrosion, copper and iron anodes will be fitted in the five sea chests, which are linked to the control panel.

During operation, the ions produced by the copper anode will prevent settling of the barnacle and mussel larvae and clogging of the engine cooling and firefighting systems.

Simultaneously, the iron anode will generate ions that will form a protective coating on the inner surface of the pipeline to reduce corrosion.

In ships that use steel pipes, aluminium anodes can be used to provide corrosion protection.

The copper ion concentration is approximately two parts per billion, which can effectively prevent the settling of marine organisms, but has no effect on the marine environment after it is discharged.

Industrial & Marine Supplies Evac agent in Turkey Erdal Dincer said: “This is a very advanced oil spill recovery vessel and we are delighted to be supplying equipment, which will keep vital seawater systems free from blockages.”

In 2018, International Maritime Organization (IMO) launched a new global project in collaboration with the Global Environment Facility (GEF) and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) to address bioinvasions in ship hulls and other marine structures.