Flexport launches ocean freight consolidation platform OceanMatch

29 March 2019 (Last Updated March 29th, 2019 11:51)

Freight forwarder and customs broker Flexport has launched the new first data-informed ocean freight consolidation platform, OceanMatch, which allows shippers to lower freight costs.

Flexport launches ocean freight consolidation platform OceanMatch
OceanMatch shippers can access the FCL freight benefits without paying for a whole container. Credit: flightlog / Flickr.

Freight forwarder and customs broker Flexport has launched the new first data-informed ocean freight consolidation platform, OceanMatch, which allows shippers to lower freight costs.

OceanMatch will be capable of identifying available container space on compatible shipments and matches them to save time and money for Flexport shippers.

OceanMatch shippers can access the benefits of Full Container Load (FCL) freight without filling or paying for a whole container.

Flexport CEO and founder Ryan Petersen said: “The launch of OceanMatch is a key example of our Operating System for Global Trade coming to life.

“Where other freight forwarders see shipments as just a 20ft or 40ft container, our data tells us this is 1,000 pairs of shoes and that’s 100 mountain bikes. It’s that insight that lets us do more for our clients’ shipments and supply chain priorities.”

“The platform improves the usage of a container to directly reduce the associated carbon emissions.”

The company is offering the new platform through its strategic operating model Operating System for Global Trade that blends technology, infrastructure and human expertise to deliver faster transit times.

Shippers can also use OceanMatch to lower carbon footprint. The platform improves the usage of a container to directly reduce the associated carbon emissions.

Flexport Ocean Consolidations vice-president Ram Siddarth said: “Shippers have always had to choose between shipping cadence and container utilisation.

“If you chose to purchase in smaller quantities or if your factory couldn’t produce enough inventory on time to fill up a container, you had no choice but to sacrifice container utilisation and ship a partly empty container, or risk disrupting your supply chain.”