DEME unveils new subsea cable installation and trenching vessel in Spain

18 September 2016 (Last Updated September 18th, 2016 18:30)

Belgium-based DEME has launched a new subsea cable installation and trenching vessel called Living Stone at the LaNaval shipyard located near Bilbao in Spain.

Belgium-based DEME has launched a new subsea cable installation and trenching vessel called Living Stone at the LaNaval shipyard located near Bilbao in Spain.

Featuring dynamic positioning 3 (DP3) capability, the newly launched vessel is powered by dual fuel engines, with liquefied natural gas (LNG) being its main fuel.

Equipped with two turntables below deck, each with a 5,000t cable capacity, Living Stone provides an environment-friendly approach to the operators.

"The ship’s turntables are capable of carrying more than 200km of cable, that can be installed in a single trip."

Together, the ship’s turntables are capable of carrying more than 200km of cable, that can be installed in a single trip.

With a deck space of 3,500m², the vessel can add a third carousel above the deck, with an additional load capacity of 2,000t and a 600t of crane.

DEME’s Dutch subsidiary Tideway has developed a new system for Living Stone, enabling the ship to install cables faster and more efficiently in longer lengths, and with less offshore joints than its counterparts.

Designed to serve transport and installation projects, the vessel can carry up to 100 crew members.

The vessel has also been designed to undertake offshore power cable installations, interconnectors and other activities for the future European Supergrid.

By the second quarter of next year, Living Stone will be first deployed at its first project at the Merkur offshore wind farm in Germany, to install inter array cables.

It will also be used to install cable at the world’s biggest offshore wind farm, Hornsea Project One in the UK.

Established in 1991, DEME currently employs more than 4,600 people and has projects across the world.


Image: DEME launches Living Stone vessel. Photo: courtesy of DEME.