Marco Polo cruise ship freed after being grounded off Norway

2 November 2014 (Last Updated November 2nd, 2014 18:30)

The cruise ship MS Marco Polo has been freed after it ran aground in the Lofoten Islands, northern Norway, on 1 November.

The cruise ship MS Marco Polo has been freed after it ran aground in the Lofoten Islands, northern Norway, on 1 November.

The ship was lodged in a mud bank with 763 passengers, the majority of which are British, onboard while attempting to anchor in adverse wind conditions.

"The comfort and safety of our passengers is our top priority and our passengers have been kept fully updated of the situation."

Cruise & Maritime Voyages (CMV), who chartered the ship, said that it was on its way to berth in Leknes.

The ship has now been manoeuvred off the mud bank with the assistance of the evening high-water tide and continued its 14 night voyage to Norway and the Land of the Northern Lights, en-route to Alta, the company added.

CMV commercial director Chris Coates said: "The comfort and safety of our passengers is our top priority and our passengers have been kept fully updated of the situation."

Divers checked the vessel’s hull and propulsion systems after the accident, but no damage was found.

Nobody has been injured and there has been no oil pollution arising out of the incident, CMV stated.

After the incident, the operator was able to transfer passengers ashore by tender.

Earlier in February, an 85-year-old passenger was killed after a wave crashed through the windows of the cruise ship.