UK ratifies EU’s decision on carriage of hazardous and noxious substances by sea

17 November 2015 (Last Updated November 17th, 2015 18:30)

The UK Government has approved the European Commission's decision on the International Convention on Liability and Compensation for Damage in Connection with the Carriage of Hazardous and Noxious Substances (HNS) by sea.

The UK Government has approved the European Commission’s decision on the International Convention on Liability and Compensation for Damage in Connection with the Carriage of Hazardous and Noxious Substances (HNS) by sea.

The 2010 HNS Protocol has proposed two council decisions regarding the matters of judicial cooperation in civil matters and with the exception of matters related to judicial cooperation in civil matters.

The proposals are expected to help EU member states to ratify the 2010 HNS Protocol by removing hassles related to EU legislation.

Due to concerns that many EU Member States had over the 1996 HNS Convention, it has never been brought into force.

"The government took the view in this instance that UK interests would be best served by opting in to the proposed decision that deals with ‘aspects related to judicial cooperation in civil matters’."

In a statement, the UK Government said: "The government took the view in this instance that UK interests would be best served by opting in to the proposed decision that deals with ‘aspects related to judicial cooperation in civil matters’, as this would retain the UK’s ability to fully ratify the HNS Protocol, and the removal of any binding deadline from the proposal has the effect of maintaining the UK’s current flexibility to be able to ratify and accede to the HNS Protocol if and when we are ready to do so."

Earlier this month, the UK Chamber of Shipping published a new study that analyses the impact of the European Union (EU) on the UK’s shipping industry.

The study proposed the review of existing regulations while bringing out transparency in their formulation, thus enabling the removal of unnecessary, failed or outdated regulation.