Wärtsilä debuts dry waste treatment portfolio for cruise ships

4 December 2016 (Last Updated December 4th, 2016 18:30)

Wärtsilä has developed a complete treatment solution to help handle dry waste in cruise ships.

Wärtsilä has developed a complete treatment solution to help handle dry waste in cruise ships.

Enabling the company to debut in the dry waste treatment business for cruise ships, the newly developed waste treatment system will help the global shipping industry to focus on sustainability.

The new solution can be used for both ‘black’ and ‘grey’ water waste, as well as disposing of dry and food waste.

"Our waste treatment systems are state-of-the-art in terms of both technology and energy efficiency."

Meyer Werft shipyard has already selected the solution for use in a new cruise, owned by British cruise operator Saga Cruises, with an option to use the system on a second vessel.

Equipped with new membrane technology, the Wärtsilä Advanced Wastewater Treatment system will provide an environmentally clean, safe and energy-efficient means of handling the vessel’s effluent and garbage.

Compared to traditional membrane systems, the new system allows energy savings of up to 50%.

Wärtsilä Marine Solutions water systems general manager Kevin Robertson said: “Wärtsilä offers a complete range of environmental solutions that meet both current and anticipated maritime regulations.

“Our waste treatment systems are state-of-the-art in terms of both technology and energy efficiency.

“Saga Cruises and Meyer Werft are both important customers, and we have tailored the solution for these ships to meet their specific needs and requests.”

The company noted that the each of the new Saga Cruises vessel will be equipped with its advanced wastewater treatment system, including grease traps, buffer tanks, and membrane bioreactors.

In addition, Wärtsilä’s dry waste disposal system, food waste vacuum system, bio-sludge treatment system, and dry garbage system will be fitted with the vessels.

Featuring 236m in length, the vessels will be able to accommodate 999 passengers and will sail in several environmentally protected sea areas worldwide, including Baltic Sea and Alaskan waters.