TMC to deliver marine compressed air system to Vard

19 June 2019 (Last Updated June 19th, 2019 12:24)

TMC Compressors of the Seas (TMC) has won a contract from naval architecture and marine engineering firm Vard to deliver the compressed air system for two cruise ships.

TMC to deliver marine compressed air system to Vard
TMC Compressors of the Seas has secured a contract to deliver marine compressed air system to Vard. Credit: Viking Cruises.

TMC Compressors of the Seas (TMC) has won a contract from naval architecture and marine engineering firm Vard to deliver the compressed air system for two cruise ships.

Norwegian shipbuilder Vard stated that the marine compressed air system will be installed on two cruise ships, which are under construction on behalf of operator Viking Cruises.

For each of the two new-build cruise ships, TMC will supply a comprehensive marine compressed air system, which includes instrument air compressors and air dryers.

The value of the contract has not been disclosed by TMC.

TMC Compressors of the Seas European sales manager Morten Orlien said: "As the international cruise sector increasingly emphasizes reduced energy consumption and lower emissions to air, our compressed air systems are becoming progressively more popular amongst cruise operators and shipbuilders.

"Simply because we can offer a highly energy efficient system that is also highly reliable, delivering reduced operational expenditure throughout the lifetime of the system. We are very thankful to VARD for this contract."

The new ships have been designed by Vard Design in Aalesund, Norway. Delivery is expected to take place in the second quarters of 2021 and 2022 respectively.

The vessels are being constructed at Vard’s Norwegian yards. The hulls have been built in Romania.

Under the agreement, Viking Cruises also has an option to place an order for two additional ships from VARD.

Recently, Vard secured a contract from Australian expedition cruise operator Coral Expeditions to build a second expedition cruise ship. Named Coral Geographer, the second ship will be 93.4m-long and can transport 120 passengers.