Siemens and Esvagt to deploy new wind farm service vessels

25 June 2015 (Last Updated June 25th, 2015 18:30)

Siemens and offshore rescue and support vessel operator Esvagt have named two purpose-built service operation vessels (SOV).

SOV

Siemens and offshore rescue and support vessel operator Esvagt have named two purpose-built service operation vessels (SOV).

The Havyard-built vessels, Esvagt Froude and Esvagt Faraday, will be able to carry personnel and equipment for service and maintenance work on offshore windmills.

The vessels are designed to offer more uptime and power production from their turbines.

Esvagt Froude will be deployed to carry out service and maintenance operations at EnBW’s Baltic II wind farm in the Baltic Sea, while Esvagt Faraday will deliver its services for WPD’s Butendiek wind farm in the North Sea.

Siemens Power Generation Services CEO Randy Zwirn said: "Siemens is committed to pioneering new technologies and new service strategies that make the lifecycle cost of wind energy competitive.

"These new SOVs that are a key part of our offshore service logistics for providing accurate, efficient and safe offshore wind service."

"One of the ways we accomplish this is with these new SOVs that are a key part of our offshore service logistics for providing accurate, efficient and safe offshore wind service."

These 83.7m-long and 17.6m-wide ships will be capable of accommodating 60 people and cruising at a speed of 14k.

Designed in partnership with Siemens’ Maritime and Aviation Solutions department, the vessels feature safety mechanisms that will allow for better turbine access than traditional crew transfer vessels (CTV), in wave heights of up to 2.5m.

With a deck area of up to 900m², the SOVs provide 450m² of deck space for workshop facilities, and six 20ft containers for spare parts.

The vessel’s cargo deck can accommodate standard 20ft containers for necessary spare parts for wind turbine maintenance.


Image: The new SOV’s are designed to offer more uptime and power production from their turbines. Photo: courtesy of Siemens AG.