August’s top stories: African mega-ports and Atomflot’s record-breaking icebreaker

4 September 2012 (Last Updated September 4th, 2012 18:30)

August brought with it a number of high-profile, high-value orders, especially for research vessels, while the next generation of mega-ports and terminals geared up for operation. Ship Technology wraps up the key headlines from August 2012.

August’s top stories: African mega-ports and Atomflot’s record-breaking icebreaker

Kenya invites bids to build three berths at Lamu port

Kenya’s $5.3bn Lamu port project at Manda Bay is moving forward, with bids invited for the design and construction of three berths at the 32-berth port, which forms part of the $23bn Lamu Port-Southern Sudan-Ethiopia Transport Corridor Project (Lappset).

Once completed, the three berths will have the capacity to handle 30,000dwt of general cargo and 100,000dwt of bulk cargo. They will be capable of accommodating large vessels, and will act as a gateway for the rest of the project through the import of construction materials.

Baltic Shipyard to build nuclear-powered icebreaker for Atomflot

icebreaker

United Shipbuilding subsidiary Baltic Shipyard has secured a $1.17bn order from Russian company Atomflot to build a new nuclear-powered icebreaker, dubbed the LK-60. The 60MW vessel is expected to become the largest and most powerful icebreaker ever built upon its scheduled completion in 2017.

Baltic Shipyard did not have to face heavy competition for the contract, as it was the only company to actually submit a bid for it in summer 2011.

 

Aker Arctic to design polar research icebreaker for China

China’s polar icebreaker Xuelong, bought from the Ukraine in 1993, is set to be joined by a brand new polar research vessel, which is being designed by Aker Arctic for the China State Oceanic Administration (SOA) and other Chinese research institutions.

The new vessel will be capable of carrying 90 crew, and will be able to break through ice up to 1.5m thick. Aker’s initial design work is expected to take around seven months to complete.

APM signs Lázaro Cárdenas port terminal contract in Mexico

apm

A new $300m container terminal at the Port of Lázaro Cárdenas in Mexico has found its main contractor. APM Terminals Lazaro Cardenas has signed a 32-year concession contract with the port to design, finance, build, operate and maintain the new terminal.

Construction is due to start this month, with completion scheduled for 2015. The project’s main components are a 43ha container yard and a 650m quay with seven super post-panamax ship-to-shore gantry cranes.

Sembcorp Marine secures $4bn contract to build five drillships for Sete Brasil

A huge $4bn order came through for Sembcorp Marine subsidiary Jurong Offshore in August. The company will design and build five drillships for Sete Brasil, based on its Jurong Espadon drillship design.

The deepwater vessels, which will be capable of operating in water depths of up to 10,000ft and drilling to depths of up to 40,000ft, are scheduled to be delivered between Q2 2015 and Q2 2019. The drillships will then be chartered to Brazilian energy corporation Petrobras.

ICTSI to develop and operate container terminal in Nigeria

Another major African port project is gearing up for operation, with Philippines-based port operator ICTSI signing a deal to develop and operate the Lekki international container terminal in Nigeria for 21 years. The terminal is expected to be the largest in sub-Saharan Africa on completion in 2016, with 1,200m quay and an annual capacity of 2.5 million teus.

Tolaram Group, the lead developer of the terminal, believes that demand at the terminal will soon outstrip its capacity, so ICTSI would likely take the lead on further expansions to meet demand.

Caterpillar introduces new vessel tracking system

Caterpillar Marine Power Systems has launched a new tracking system for the Cat-compatible yacht and vessel market. The system, called gplink, uses GSM communications and the Iridium satellite system to ensure global coverage.

Gplink can monitor a multitude of engine and system parameters on a compatible vessel, issuing notifications via e-mail, phone or SMS concerning any critical or emergency situations.

Damen delivers ‘silent’ research vessel to Flemish government

damen

A new research vessel developed by Damen Shipyards and the Flemish Institute for the Sea (VLIZ) is claimed to be the smallest vessel in the world that conforms to a number of strict environmental standards, including underwater radiated noise.

The ‘silent’, environmentally compliant research craft will be used by the Flemish government for research on climate change, sustainable fishing and energy production at sea. As such, it is outfitted with a range of advanced equipment, including 3D imaging systems, a dynamic positioning system and kit for various experimental fishing methods.