CAEM’s emissions treatment system receives CARB approval

5 July 2015 (Last Updated July 5th, 2015 18:30)

Clean Air Engineering-Maritime (CAEM) has secured approval from California air resources board (CARB) for its first commercially ready ship emissions capturing system.

CARB

Clean Air Engineering-Maritime (CAEM) has secured approval from California air resources board (CARB) for its first commercially ready ship emissions capturing system.

Named the maritime emissions treatment system (METS-1), the new solution can be positioned over vessels’ smoke stacks, and will be capable of capturing and treating more than 90% of particulate matter (PM), NOx, SO2, and related diesel pollutants emitted.

Developed in collaboration with Tri-Mer Corporation of Owosso, the new system is mounted and deployed from a barge positioned alongside ships berthed at the Port of Los Angeles.

CAEM principal Nick Tonsich said: "The METS-1 will have an immediate, direct and positive impact on the communities surrounding the Port of Los Angeles and Long Beach.

" The METS-1 will have an immediate, direct and positive impact on the communities surrounding the Port of Los Angeles and Long Beach."

"In the long-term, given the fact that there are so many ships in the world’s fleet without cold-ironing capability, the METS system could have a profound impact on the entire shipping industry and our global environment."

The new solution is the first CARB-approved alternative to ‘plugging in’ to shore-side power, which is the current standard that complies with California’s regulation for airborne toxic control measure for auxiliary diesel engines operating on ocean-going vessels at-berth in a California port (At-Berth).

The METS project received a $1.5m grant from the Port of Los Angeles’s technology advancement programme (TAP) to TraPac, which made a deal with CAEM to conduct research and develop on the METS project.

From last year, the CARB testing comprised performance evaluations of the METS on five separate vessels for a minimum of 200 hours.


Image: Cargo ship in port being loaded with containers. Photo: courtesy of Marketwire LP.